Wildlife rescue organizations work together in order to provide the best available care to injured, sick and orphaned wildlife. One of Native Animal Rescue’s vital partners is International Bird Rescue. International Bird Rescue cares for sick, injured, abused, and orphaned aquatic birds at a year-round wildlife care center in the San Francisco Bay Area. Native Animal Rescue routinely transports distressed aquatic birds to the SF Bay Area center located in Fairfield. The following article, published by the SF Bay Area center this week, is the story of a Brandt Cormorant found in an Aptos garage and transported to Native Animal Rescue where the bird’s journey to health begins.

It Takes a Village

Brandt’s Cormorant Makes Its Way to Bird Rescue

The old proverb “It Takes a Village” is one we tend to live by at Bird Rescue, and the Brandt’s Cormorant featured in this week’s photo is a great example of how that proverb comes to life for us. We see thousands of birds in our centers each year, and often times a bird’s path to us involves many caring people and organizations.

The cormorant featured above was found in a person’s garage in Aptos, California. The concerned homeowner contacted our friends at Native Animal Rescue in Santa Cruz, California, who took the injured bird, stabilized it, and promptly transferred it to us. Native Animal Rescue, like Bird Rescue itself, does not have its own transport for birds. Instead, we rely on kind-hearted volunteers. In the case of this cormorant, our long-time volunteers Joan and Larry took the initiative and drove the bird on the long journey from Santa Cruz to our San Francisco Bay-Delta wildlife center in Fairfield, CA. Because our facility is highly specialized for the care of water birds, it was deemed the best chance for the bird’s treatment.

The route that this Brandt’s Cormorant took to get the treatment it needed is a perfect example of what happens with so many of the birds we see. Aquatic birds make up a distinct group, and we are one of the only organizations in California that specializes in treating and rehabilitating them. For this reason, many different organizations send them to us. Similarly, we transfer birds to these same partners when they are better equipped and skilled to work with a non-aquatic bird patient.

Transferring and transporting an injured bird to Bird Rescue usually depends on the efforts of volunteers and the transferring organizations. The journey sometimes takes a great deal of effort and is often time sensitive. We are grateful to be part of such a caring network of people and organizations, all committed to protecting wildlife. As always, we thank our volunteers and partners for being part of this great and life-saving team!